Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Trying Out Training Plans

Today's TOTR is advice to give to my newbie self, but any of my readers would probably figure out my advice would be to keep cross training and strength training to stave off ITBS.  I won't beat that point today though.  There's a reason why my first half was my strongest after playing soccer for a few seasons.


Today I'm reaching out for recommended training plans going forward.  Since my PT wants me to run more consistently/frequently during the week, my current training plan is a no go for future training.  So what else is out there?  I know Hanson's has a lot of running, but their website requires I buy the plan to see the details.  OK, anybody use this, and is it worth the price?  Would anybody recommend other plans?

Once Tink is done, I don't have anything on my schedule, and I'm going to keep it that way until I see some good results from all this PT.  I want to join my friends in a low-key summer soccer league so I can keep sharpening these stability muscles and make them work.  Games wouldn't start until June, and I am looking at a knee brace to keep my ITB stable for these games.  

Tuesdays on the Run with Patty, Erika, and Marcia.  

18 comments:

  1. I've been using the Hal Higdon plans but they aren't that much running during the week. Jennifer (http://dashinginstyle.com/)and Courtney (www.eatprayrundc.com) talk about the Hanson's plan so you may want to check out their blogs if you don't already.

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    1. I did, thanks. It's a lot of running, and I don't know if I have time for it right now. I need a hybrid of various plans.

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  2. Hal Higdon is the gold standard, although I've never used him. Another Mother Runner has good plans -- I've used those, and they often include cross training, and are quite flexible.

    I also have one of the journals from run the edge -- http://www.runtheedge.com/products/#dtp -- I'm actually sort of combining that with a AMR plan I used last year -- it's also flexible and encourages cross training.

    Then you can look at runner's world, women's running, and shape -- they all usually have some free running plans!

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    1. Thanks. I'll have time next month to look at ones I'd want to do.

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  3. I was just reading about the Hanson plan on Dashing with Style blog. She seems to really like that plan but it sounds like it is alot of running.-L

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    1. It does, I didn't realize it was that much running. I've got some researching to do.

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  4. Coaching track athletes, the soccer players always seem to bring an edge. I've had great success with Run Less Run Faster. I think it benefits those who cross- and strength-train well. Other than that I've used custom plans designed for me by coaches. One was great, the other sort of mediocre. All the best with your search!

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    1. I'll look into a coach creating a plan for me. I do have time to run 3-4 times a week, but life always gets in the way, and 5-6 times is too much.

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  5. Full or half? I used the Hansons plan for my last two half marathons and am a huge fan. You can see the plan on my blog, which I re-wrote from the book, to get a feel for it. However, I strongly suggest buying the book if you want to do the plan. If you don't understand the method--there's a lot behind it--you may be tempted to toy around with the plan, and then you're likely to get injured (I've read reports of people that's happened to.) The Hansons philosophy actually comes from Jack Daniels, who said your long runs shouldn't be more than 25-30% of your weekly volume because long runs that are more than that are more likely to lead to injury. And the Hansons book does say that the most injuries they've seen are from runners doing low weekday miles and high weekend miles. I peaked at 47 weeks and not only did I never have an injury, I never even had an ache or pain. That said, you have to be really committed to the plan because it's very, very tough. Many runners I know who tried it said it was the hardest plan they'd ever done, but they also ran great races. If you have a really big goal, you should look into it!

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    1. I'm sticking with 10k's if I can build up my strength enough. I don't know if I want to do half marathons again, but never say never.

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  6. Cast another vote from me for Hal Higdon's plans. I also like Jeff Galloway's training plans a lot. He emphasizes using walk breaks in training, which folks seem to either love or hate - but I am a big fan!

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    1. I love those walking breaks. I don't know if I could've done my four halfs if I didn't walk.

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  7. I occasionally work with a gal who came back from IBS a few years back and now she's back to marathons. It took her a while, but I know she finds that 4-5 days a week of running are far better for her and she's never had a relaps. I am not sure what she was doing before. But ironically, she also uses soccer, she's on an indoor league. Maybe soccer cross training is an excellent choice? :)

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    1. It is certainly taking me a while, but I want to do this right. I don't want to bring on my injury again because that was awful.

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  8. I would suggest Hal Higdon or checking with your local running store, or gym, to see if they have any training programs.

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    1. I'll have to ask my LRS in person. Their website only shows half and full marathon coaching.

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  9. I think soccer over the summer is a great idea! I've used Hal Higdons plans in the past but since joining a running group, my coach puts together all my training plans for me. Best of luck in finding something that works for you!! :)

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    1. I do think a coach would be a good option to try. I haven't gone that route but it might be worth it.

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