Thursday, November 13, 2014

Running and Doping

For those who didn't see the news prior to NYC, Rita Jeptoo failed an out of competition drug test in September and has requested her B sample be tested.  The World Marathon Majors ceremony was postponed since she would have been the one receiving the $500,000 prize.  She won Boston and Chicago last year and Boston and Chicago this.  In fact, the out of competition drug test was conducted a few weeks before she ran Chicago.  The first reports would not say what drug was found, but later it was confirmed as EPO.


When I saw the reports, I couldn't help but feel extremely disappointed.  I know doping touches practically every sport out there; there's so much money wrapped up in sports nowadays, and pressure to win comes with that.  But that still didn't prep for me for the disappointed feelings I had while reading the articles about Jeptoo's drug test.  Since the B sample results have not been released, it is still a pending investigation, but if EPO was in her system, it's hard to think the B sample won't have EPO either.


Now, another article has come out with Jeptoo's estranged husband saying she's been doping since 2011.  Even though there is no evidence/ no articles saying she failed drug tests after she won her races (specifically Boston and Chicago in 2013 and 2014), that report yesterday made my blood boil.  My feelings about this are, of course, wrapped up in Boston.  Jeptoo won Boston in 2013 and 2014.  She set the course record this year, as did several of the women who ran with her.  I feel protective of that race, and not just because of 2013.  The town I grew up in is the halfway point on the course.  I know people who have run Boston, and I know the feeling of waking up on Marathon Monday, even if you're not one of the runners.


Since reading the most recent article, my knee-jerk reaction is to strip her of those post-2011 titles.  Her husband's statement certainly casts doubt on those victories and even taints her results of races she didn't win.   It all boils down to her B test results, but I can't help but doubt everything she does from here on out.


6 comments:

  1. That is so disappointing to hear. This is the first time I heard it. Guess the B test will tell. But like you said, I doubt that'll be any different. -L

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    1. Right, I don't see EPO disappearing in a B test if it's a good positive in the A test. I was very disappointed to see that.

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  2. I heard about this and its so disappointing. I know that it goes on in all sports but I would like to think that runners are better than that. But we all know that it happens more that we would like to believe.

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    1. I do know it happens, but it hard a bit hard since she won Boston this year. This year was supposed to show the city back on its feet, and now the women's race is tainted.

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  3. I heard about this, and it made me sad! The one thing I do like about the sport of running vs cycling (so far) it seems it is not put up with, and they out them quickly and don't let things drag on.
    I know their are ways they do this, that don't show up on the drug screen tests, and I know that athletes and coaches on that level are always looking for ways to beat those systems. I find it sad, I would much rather cheer someone who isn't having their best race who doesn't dope, than someone who is winning or doing their best who is... Just a shame!
    I also always feel bad for the person who comes in 2nd to them. Sure later on they get the reward. But they missed out on what was rightfully theirs to begin with, and by then the applause is long gone.. dissapointed in this runner!

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    1. Yes, I feel bad for 2nd place too. If they're clean, they're the ones who deserve the pomp and post-race ceremony.

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